Saturday, July 18, 2015

THESE WERE THE SYMBOLS (II)



Estas algas eran los símbolos de aquellos fantásticos y fabulosos pensamientos que todavía no han entrado en las cuevas protegidas de la literatura

"Ever drifting, drifting, drifting
          On the shifting
     Currents of the restless heart,"
 And not yet "in books recorded
          They, like hoarded
     Household words, no more depart."(*)



HDT ( Cape Cod, The beach)

(*) Seaweed, by Longfellow: Thoreau omits 5th, 6th, and 7th of the original eight stanzas

Labels: , , ,

Saturday, July 11, 2015

CAPE COD (I): HACE 150 AÑOS


"Cape Cod is Thoreau's sunniest, happiest book. It bubbles over with jokes, puns, tall tales, and genial good humor the model to which all new books about the Cape are still compared." - Walter Harding





El marinero que hace su puerto más seguro en el Cielo quizás les parece a sus amigos en la tierra que ha naufragado, porque consideran el puerto de Boston el lugar más seguro (...)
El viento más fuerte no puede rendir un Espíritu, es un aliento del Espíritu. El propósito de un hombre justo no puede ser partido sobre cualquier Grampus o material de rocas, sino que por sí mismo deshará rocas hasta que tenga éxito.

HDT (Cape Cod, The Shipwreck)



[20] Why care for these dead bodies? They really have no friends but the worms or fishes. Their owners were coming to the New World, as Columbus and the Pilgrims did, — they were within a mile of its shores; but, before they could reach it, they emigrated to a newer world than ever Columbus dreamed of, yet one of whose existence we believe that there is far more universal and convincing evidence — though it has not yet been discovered by science — than Columbus had of this; not merely mariners' tales and some paltry drift-wood and sea-weed, but a continual drift and instinct to all our shores. I saw their empty hulks that came to land; but they themselves, meanwhile, were cast upon some shore yet further west, toward which we are all tending, and which we shall reach at last, it may be through storm and darkness, as they did. No doubt, we have reason to thank God that they have not been "shipwrecked into life again." The mariner who makes the safest port in Heaven, perchance, seems to his friends on earth to be shipwrecked, for they deem Boston Harbor the better place; though perhaps invisible to them, a skilful pilot comes to meet him, and the fairest and balmiest gales blow off that coast, his good ship makes the land in halcyon days, and he kisses the shore in rapture there, while his old hulk tosses in the surf here. It is hard to part with one's body, but, no doubt, it is easy enough to do without it when once it is gone. All their plans and hopes burst like a bubble! Infants by the score dashed on the rocks by the enraged Atlantic Ocean! No, no! If the St. John did not make her port here, she has been telegraphed there. The strongest wind cannot stagger a Spirit; it is a Spirit's breath. A just man's purpose cannot be split on any Grampus or material rock, but itself will split rocks till it succeeds.

[21] The verses addressed to Columbus, dying, may, with slight alterations, be applied to the passengers of the St. John: —

"Soon with them will all be over,

Soon the voyage will be begun

That shall bear them to discover,

Far away, a land unknown.

"Land that each, alone, must visit,

But no tidings bring to men;

For no sailor, once departed,

Ever hath returned again.

"No carved wood, no broken branches

Ever drift from that far wild;

He who on that ocean launches

Meets no corse of angel child.

"Undismayed, my noble sailors,

Spread, then spread your canvas out;

Spirits! on a sea of ether

Soon shall ye serenely float!

"Where the deep no plummet soundeth,

Fear no hidden breakers there,

And the fanning wing of angels

Shall your bark right onward bear.

"Quit, now, full of heart and comfort,

These rude shores, they are of earth;

Where the rosy clouds are parting,

There the blessed isles loom forth."



http://thoreau.eserver.org/capecd00.html



CLARE LEIGHTON (ILUSTRACION) Y HENRY BESTON (CITA) EN TU CAPE COD CON INTRODUCCION DE ROBERT FINCH (PARNASSUS IMPRINTS, INC., HYAANNIS, CUARTA EDICION JULIO DE 1997)

CAPE COD HACE 150 AÑOS ROBERT FINCH

Labels: , , , , ,

CAPE COD




Saturday, July 04, 2015

INDEPENDENCE


El modo de ser de nuestra vida, nuestro ser-así, es nuestro arsenal, y de él nos crecen las armas cuando tenemos necesidad de ellas.
xx


Algunos poemas son para las vacaciones solo. Son educados y dulces, pero se trata de la dulzura del azúcar, y no de aquella que el esfuerzo da al pan amargo. El aliento con el que el poeta pronuncia su verso debe ser aquél por el cual él vive.

HDT ( " A week ...";Friday)


4 de Julio de 2001-4 de julio de 2015

¿INDEPENDENCIA?

Mi vida es más cívica y libre
que cualquier cuerpo político.

Guarda príncipe tus posesiones
y tu poder circunscrito,
no son tan amplios como mis sueños,
ni tan ricos como esta hora.

¿Qué me ofreces que yo no tenga?
¿Qué puedes tomar de lo que tengo?
¿Puedes defender lo que no tiene peligro?
¿Puedes heredar la desnudez?

El oído de los tiempos es sordo a todas la necesidades verdaderas,
los estados estériles no proporcionan ningún alivio con su botín
-pero un alma libre –gracias a Dios-
puede ayudar por sí misma.

Asegúrate de que tu destino
queda aparte de su estado
-no ligado con cualquier banda-
incluso los nobles de la tierra
en campamentos con vestido de oro
no ocuparán en él ningún lugar
porque tiene más señorío que ellos.
Y busca una guerra más noble.
una melodía más hermosa resuena en su trompeta,
un reflejo más brillante irradia su armadura.

La vida a la que aspiro
nadie me la propone-
ningún trato en el comercio público
utiliza su marca.

HENRY DAVID THOREAU

(Traducción Guillermo Ruiz)


¿INDEPENDENCE?

My life more civil is and free
Than any civil polity.

Ye princes keep your realms
And circumscribed power,
Not wide as are my dreams,
Nor rich as is this hour.

What can ye give which I have not?
What can ye take which I have got?
Can ye defend the dangerless?
Can ye inherit nakedness?

To all true wants time’s ear is deaf,
Penurious states lend no relief
Out of their pelf
-But a free soul -thank God-
Can help itself.

Be sure your fate
Doth keep apart its state
—Not linked with any band—
Even the nobles of the land
In tented fields with cloth of gold—
No place doth hold
But is more chivalrous than they are.
And sigheth for a nobler war.
A finer strain its trumpet rings—
A brighter gleam its armor flings.

The life that I aspire to live
No man proposeth me-
No trade upon the street
Wears its emplazonry.

HDT
















Labels: ,

Friday, July 03, 2015

NATURALEZA Y SALUD MENTAL

Suscribir con Bloglines Creative Commons License
Esta

Subscribe to
Posts [Atom]

Wikio – Top Blogs